Haitian Creole (Kreyol, Ayisyen)

Haitian Creole (Kreyol, Ayisyen) is the native language of Haiti and spoken in Haitian diaspora communities in France, Canada, US, Dominican Republic, and other locals. Ayisyen is an official language of Haiti, as well as French. Its official orthorgraphy was constructed in 1975.


Structure


Haitian Creole (Kreyol, Ayisyen) is characterize as having a french lexicon (vocabulary) but an African syntax (grammar) and semantics. Ewe, Gbe (broader Kwa family) influenced Kreyol's syntax. In addition, Haitian nouns are not marked for number and gender like in French. It has no plural endings for nouns. Furthermore, reflexification seems to have occured in Haitian Creole, words from African languages replaced French word. A morpheme in French might take on the meaning of an African language. Ayisyen is more African than say Louisiana Creole because it had less contact with the French language.

History


It is believed Kreyol was birthed during the 1700s. Attempts to write down the language began in the eighteenth century, but it was not extensive. In the 1940s, Ormande McConnell and Frank Laubach developed the first orthorgraphy for  Ayisyen. Later in the 1950s, Haitian educator Charles Fernand Pressoir and Lelio Faubias, modified the McConnell-Laubach spelling. In 1975, the National Pedagogic Institute(IPN) developed a new orthography taking components of both McConnell-Laubach and Pressoir-Lelio. The system was officially accepted by the government of Haiti in 1979 and remains the main orthography for writing the Haitian language today. 

Alphabet


Kreyol has a 29 character alphabet.

an
b
ch
d
è 
en 
i
j
ò 
on 
ou 
ui 
y
z


Work Cited



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