Seychelles French Creole

Seychelle French Creole (Créole Seychellois, Creole, Ilois, Kreol, Kreol Seselwa, Seselwa, Seychelles Creole French, Seychellois Creole) is the common language of the island Republic of Seychelle. It is one of the three official language comprising of French and English. Seychelle French Creole has a greater similiarity to Mauritian French Creole, than to La Reunion French Creole. It is spoken outside the region in Kenya, the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand, in transplanted communities.

History


For most of its history Seychelle remain uninhabited. It was first occuppied by the French in 1660 from Reunion Island and later in 1721 by the French from Mauritius--islands of the Mascarenes. They brought with them their slaves. Slaves initially came from Madagascar, but between 1735 to 1740 , they came from Senegambia and the Slave Coast. After the 1760s, most slaves come from east Africa. In 1814, Seychelle and Mauritius were transferred to Britain. In 1835, slavery was abolished. 

The first written text in Seychelle French Creole was a translation by Rodolphine Young, of Fables de La Fontaine translated into the Seychelle French Creole, in the latter part of the 19th Century or early 20th Century. Two grammars were published in 1977, two grammars of the creole was published. Diksyonner Kreol – franse was published by St Jorre & Lionnet in Seychelle French Creole. Today the language is taught in primary schools. English also is becoming as wildly spoken as the creole. 

Lexicon (Vocabulary)


98% of the Seychelles French Creole vocabulary can be traced to French dialects of the 17th and 18th centuries. 35 Bantu words, including Swahili of the Niger-Congo Family, 25 Malagasy words, and 80 English loanwords can be found in the tongue. 

Phonology (Sounds)


The dreole has eight vowels-- five oral, and three nasal. The creole has seventeen consonant.

Vowels
i
u
e
o
õ
a
ã

Consonants

p
k
g
m
ŋ
s
z
ʁ
l
j

Work Cited

Michaelis, Susanne and Rosalie, Marcel. Seyechelles Creole.

Lewis, M. Paul, Gary F. Simons, and Charles D. Fennig (eds.). 2013. Ethnologue: Languages of the World, Seventeenth edition. Dallas, Texas: SIL International. Online version: http://www.ethnologue.com.

External Link:

YouTube Video